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5 Great Innovations We Can Thank Muslims For

Ever wondered where many of the creations we use on a daily basis have come from? All these fantastically clever ideas that changed life for the better must have come from somewhere!

Islamic history is brimming with amazing innovations in art, architecture, and literature, but it’s also filled with a remarkable contribution to discoveries and inventions that are still used today and are a huge part of our modern world.

Here are five mind blowing creations that you probably didn’t know were made by Muslims!

 

1- Coffee

Used by Sufis to help them stay awake for their late night devotions, coffee was first brewed in Yemen in the 9th century. It soon made its way around the Middle East and ended up in Europe in the 16th century. Today, coffee is a daily essential to help us through those tough mornings, and we simply can’t get enough!

2- Cameras

One word: SELFIES. Can you imagine a world without cameras (or camera phones)?

With multi billion dollar industries based on the idea of capturing light from a scene and creating an image from it, then reproducing that image, it is fascinating to imagine that this all started in the 11th century by a Muslim scientist.

Ibn al- Haytham was a Muslim scientist who made huge innovations in optics and came up with the idea for the first camera in the early 1000s in Cairo. Without his research into how light travels, cameras would not even exist.

3- Hospitals

The first modern hospital with trained nurses and teaching centres was established in Cairo in 872 AD. Much like our modern day NHS, all patients received free healthcare according to Islamic teaching. Even though more basic hospitals had existed before this in Baghdad, the Cairo model has served as a template for hospitals around the world to this day!

4- The Toothbrush

With Islam being one of the first religions to put a huge importance on personal hygiene, it was Prophet Mohammed (PBUH) himself who came up with the idea of a toothbrush. The twig he used came from a tree with breath freshening qualities, also known as ‘Miswak’ and are still widely used today.

5- Flying machines

A thousand years before the Wright brothers, Muslim astronomer, poet and musician Abbas ibn Firnas made a few attempts at flying using his own innovations. Even though he never stayed up in the air for long, his theories were used to create the first modern plane.

These are just some of countless contributions made by Muslims that have shaped our world today. Do you know a

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